Culverwell’s Ranch – NSHM #55

Culverwell’s Ranch – NSHM #55 is Nevada State Historical Marker number fifty five located in Lincoln county, Nevada.

Nevada State Historical Markers identify significant places of interest in Nevada’s history. The Nevada State Legislature started the program in 1967 to bring the state’s heritage to the public’s attention with on-site markers. Budget cuts to the program caused the program to become dormant in 2009. Many of the markers are lost of damaged.

Culverwell's Ranch - NSHM #55 Caliente Nevada - Early 1900's
Caliente Nevada – Early 1900’s

Caliente was first settled as a ranch, furnishing hay for the mining camps of Pioche and Delmar.  In 1901, the famous Harriman-Clark right-of-way battle was ended when rancher Charles Culverwell, with the aid of a broad-gauge shotgun, allowed one railroad grade to be built through his lush meadows.  Harriman and Clark had been baffling eleven years, building side-by-side grades ignoring court orders and federal marshals.


The population boom began with an influx of railroad workers, most of them immigrants from Austria, Japan, and the Ottoman Empire.  A tent city was settled in August 1903.

With the completion of the Las Angeles, San Pedro, and Salt Lake Railroad in 1905, Caliente became a division point.  Beginning in 1906, the Caliente and Pioche Railroad (now the Union Pacific) was built between Pioche and the main line at Caliente.  The large Mission Revival-style depot was built in 1923, serving as a civic center, as well as a hotel.

STATE HISTORICAL MARKER No. 55
STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE
LINCOLN COUNTY AREA DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE

Summary

Nevada State Historic Marker55
NameCulverwell’s Ranch
LocationLincoln County, Nevada
Latitude, Longitude37.61328, -114.51481

Culverwell’s Ranch – NSHM #55 Map

References

Delamar NSHM Nevada State Historic Marker #90

Delamar NSHM is Nevada State Historical Marker number ninety seven and is located in Lincoln County, Nevada.

Delamar mill and tailings in foreground. Hog Pen, the opening to the Delamar mine, is in the background high up on the mountain - Unknown photographer - Stanley W. Paher, Nevada Ghost Towns and Mining Camps, (1970), Howell North, p299, Ashley Cook Collection
Delamar mill and tailings in foreground. Hog Pen, the opening to the Delamar mine, is in the background high up on the mountain – Unknown photographer – Stanley W. Paher, Nevada Ghost Towns and Mining Camps, (1970), Howell North, p299, Ashley Cook Collection

Nevada State Historical Markers identify significant places of interest in Nevada’s history. The Nevada State Legislature started the program in 1967 to bring the state’s heritage to the public’s attention with on-site markers. Budget cuts to the program caused the program to become dormant in 2009. Many of the markers are lost of damaged.

Gold was discovered here in 1889. This isolated, treeless metropolis of over 1,500 residents, had a newspaper, hospital, school, churches, saloons and a stockbroker. Entertainment included brass bands, dance orchestras and stage attractions at the Opera House.

Water came from Meadow Valley Wash, 12 miles away. All other materials were hauled through the mountains by mule team 150 miles from a railroad head at Milford, Utah. For 16 years, most of the bullion was hauled out in the same manner.

The dry milling processes used prior to the introduction of wet methods created a fine silicon or “death” dust which caused the deaths of many residents and gave the town its nickname.

Delamar produced $15,000,000 in gold and was Nevada’s leading producer of that decade.

NEVADA HISTORIC MARKER #90

Delamar NSHM Map

Delamar NSHM Summary

Nevada State Historic Marker90
NameDelamar “The Widow Maker”, Nevada
LocationLincoln County, Nevada
Latitude, Longitude37.62073689, -114.7838634

References

Old Boundary (Nevada’s Southern Boundary 1861-1867) #57

Old Boundary (Nevada’s Southern Boundary 1861-1867) is Nevada State Historical Marker number fifty seven located in Lincoln county, Nevada. The marker is located about 6 miles north of Beaty along highway 95.

Nevada State Historical Markers identify significant places of interest in Nevada’s history. The Nevada State Legislature started the program in 1967 to bring the state’s heritage to the public’s attention with on-site markers. Budget cuts to the program caused the program to become dormant in 2009. Many of the markers are lost of damaged.

The 37th degree north latitude is marked at this point as the dividing line between the Territories of Utah and New Mexico under the provisions of the Compromise of 1850 which originally organized the land ceded by Mexico in 1848.

When the Territory of Nevada was carved from western Utah in 1861, this line became the southern boundary of the new territory and continued to serve as such when the Territory and State were enlarged by extensions to the east in 1862 and 1866 respectively.

In 1867, the Nevada Legislature approved the action of Congress to add that portion of the Territory of Arizona which lay to the south of this line, west of the 114 degree west longitude and the Colorado River, and to the east of the boundary of California. This action, taken on January 18, 1867, gave to the State of Nevada the permanent boundaries as they are today.

STATE HISTORICAL MARKER No. 58
STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE

Summary

Nevada State Historic Marker57
NameOld Boundary (Nevada’s Southern Boundary 1861-1867)
LocationLincoln County
Latitude, Longitude36.97724, -114.97706

References

Hiko Nevada – Lincoln County Ghost Town

Hiko Nevada starts to see initial activity in 1853. Silver mines in the area are largely responsible for the people settling the area.

Mill of Hiko Silver Mining Co. in 1871 - Timothy H. O'Sullivan - U.S. National Archives and Records Administration
Mill of Hiko Silver Mining Co. in 1871 – Timothy H. O’Sullivan – U.S. National Archives and Records Administration

The town is founded by A William Raymond when he purchased several of the twenty six mines in the area of Pahranagat Valley. Raymond built the first mill, and laid out a townsite and named it “Hiko”. The name Hiko an Indian phrase which means “white man’s town.”

By the end of 1866, the area around it had attracted a few hundred residents. Hiko was the county seat of Lincoln County from 1867 to 1871 and is home a few hundred residents living in nearby ranches. By 1871 the mining activity west of Hiko started to falter. After the mining activity subsided, a time lawlessness came to the throughout the valley. At this time, the valley is known for its cattle rustlers, horse thieves and gun-fights.

In 1871 Hiko was replaced as the county seat of Lincoln County by Pioche which continues to serve this function..

As early as 1865, a camp was established here, and during the spring of 1866, W. H. Raymond and others laid out the townsite.  The name Hiko is apparently based on a Shoshone term for “white man” or ‘white man’s town.  Raymond purchased a five-stamp mill and had it shipped via the Colorado River to Callville and then hauled by oxen the 140 miles to this site.  In November 1866, milling began on Pahranagat ores and soon after, Hiko became the first county seat of Lincoln County.  In March 1867, Raymond spent nearly $900,000 developing the region before the enterprise failed.  The mill was moved to Bullionville in 1870.  Hiko consequently declined in population and importance, which accelerated following the removal of the county government to Pioche in February 1871.

STATE HISTORICAL MARKER NO.  206, STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE, NEVADA HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Town Summary

NameHiko
LocationLincoln County, Nevada
GNIS845862
Latitude, Longitude37.5969036, -115.2241887
Elevation3,869 feet (,179m)
Nevada Historical Marker206

Hiko Town Map

References

Jackrabbit Nevada – Lincoln County Ghost Town

Jackrabbit Nevada is a ghost town and silver mining camp located in Lincoln County Nevada. Local legend attributes the discovery to the locator picking up a rock to throw at a jackrabbit and finding himself holding high grade silver.

Jackrabbit Nevada - (Theron Fox Photo) Paher, Nevada Ghost Towns and Mining Camps
Jackrabbit Nevada – (Theron Fox Photo) Paher, Nevada Ghost Towns and Mining Camps

The Jackrabbit District, named for the mine, was located in 1876 by Isaac Newton Garrison. Early mine production of the camp, at one time named Royal City, was about ten tons per day, carrying native silver in flakes, yielding about $40 per ton – sometimes as high as $2000 per ton.

Soon after the initial discover, the camp was home to several general stores, boarding houses, saloons, restaurants and a blacksmith shop. It was also the last whiskey stop for the south bound stage into Pioche.

The Day and Jackrabbit mines produce ore, which was hauled to the mills in Bristol. Mineral production declined during the 1880’s, but when a fifteen-mile narrow gauge railroad known as the “Jackrabbit Road” was opened in 1891 between the Jackrabbit mine and Pioche which increase the mining production.

After 1893 the mines fell silent except for several short periods of activity in 1906-07 and 1912-14

Town Summary

NameJack Rabbit
LocationLincoln County, Nevada
Latitude, Longitude38.094009, -114.595399
Elevation6330
Population
Post OfficeOctober 15, 1878 – January 26, 1879 – (Royal City)

Directions

The ghost town of Jackrabbit Nevada is about 14 miles north of Pioche and one mile west of the US 93.

Continue Reading →